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Posts Tagged ‘Kate Greenaway’

Once upon a time children wore miniature versions of their parents’ clothing styles. Then, in 1780 or 1790, depending on the source you read, children began to be dressed differently, wearing fashions designed just for them.

Bowden Children, John Hoppner, late 18th c.

Bowden Children, John Hoppner, late 18th c.

Skeleton suit, Kate Greenaway

Skeleton suit, Kate Greenaway

Not that small boys, left to their own devices, would have worn high-waisted, ankle length trousers made of heavy cotton or linen and white cambric shirts with ruffled trim, but these “skeleton suits” as they were called were popular for at least fifty years. The pants had high waists, because they were buttoned onto the long sleeved jacket.

Although these long-sleeved, trousered suits were meant to be comfortable, they had three layers at the waist, not including underwear. Heaven knows how hot the boys must have felt in the summer or during active play! Or how quickly the white ruffed shirts soiled! Completing the outfit were white stocking, flat-soled strap slippers, and a military-style cap. The strapped slippers can best be seen in the 1841 fashion plate image at the bottom of this post.

Boy with cap

Boy with cap

A skeleton suit, one of those straight blue cloth cases in which small boys used to be confined before belts and tunics had come in … An ingenious contrivance for displaying the symmetry of a boy’s figure by fastening him into a very tight jacket, with an ornamental row of buttons over each shoulder and then buttoning his trousers over it so as to give his legs the appearance of being hooked on just under his arm pits. (Charles Dickens, Sketches by Boz, 1838-39.)

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Adding insult to injury, was the underwear that young boys wore under these layered clothes. This sample comes from the Manchester Art Gallery.

Detail of The Hoppner Children, 1791. Formal skeleton suit.

Detail of The Hoppner Children, 1791. Formal skeleton suit.

The smaller the boy, the more elaborately frilled the collar. Colors were generally light, with the most popular being blue or green. Sometimes the suits were made of scarlet or mustard as well. For more formal occasions, a colorful sash might be added and the trousers made of silk or velvet and trimmed with lace. A young man about to go to Eton would wear the larger Eton collar.

Detail of Fluyder Children, Sir Thomas Lawrence. Skeleton suit with sash

Detail of Fluyder Children, Sir Thomas Lawrence. Skeleton suit with sash

Detail, 1841 fashion plate

Detail, 1841 fashion plate

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Little Anne illustration, Kate Greenaway

Little Anne illustration, Kate Greenaway

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Kate Greenaway was a Victorian artist who drew incidents from every day life in the Regency era from a nostalgic point of view. Although infused with Victorian sensibility, her drawings are charming and still quite popular today. A contemporary illustrator, Walter Crane, said about her:

The grace and charm of her children and young girls were quickly recognized, and her treatment of quaint early nineteenth century costume, prim gardens, and the child-like spirit of her designs in an old-world atmosphere, though touched with conscious modern ‘aestheticism,’ captivated the public in a remarkable way.

kate greenaway different kinds of blind

For Crafters: Find free Kate Greenaway clip art at this site.


Kate was born in March 1846 in Hoxton. At the age of twenty Kate produced her first printed piece.
She also started doing greeting card, calendar and book illustrations.  One of her card designs sold over 25,000 copies in just a few weeks.  Although she was paid only 3 pounds she was starting to be noticed. Her first book [Under the Window] was produced in collaboration with Edmund Evans, with whom her father had apprenticed.  Evans spared no expense and the 20,000 copies sold almost immediately so a second printing of 70,000 was produced. –  Kate Greenaway
Today many of her illustrated books can be seen online.  The Queen of the Pirate Isle, autored by Bret Harte in 1885 and offered on Project Gutenberg, is illustrated by Kate. Check it out at this link.

Illustration from The Queen of the Pirate Isle.
In 1884,  The Language of Flowers, considered by many to be the finest of Kate Greenaway’s books, was published. Only 19,500 copies were issued in all.  While Kate continued to paint watercolours for the rest of her life, she could not match the spectacular success of her earlier career. She died in 1901.

Language of Flowers, Illustrated by Kate Greenaway, 1884

Language of Flowers, Illustrated by Kate Greenaway, 1884

Kate Greenaway by David Levine

Kate Greenaway by David Levine

More links: Listed in this section are a series of books with Kate’s masterful illustrations. 

Greenaway_11_lady_sitting

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