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Posts Tagged ‘bishop sleeves’

It has been a long time since I wrote a post about fashion in the Regency era, but I haven’t forgotten fashion altogether. Over the years I have been collecting and sorting images about the Regency on my Pinterest boards, a hobby I enjoy immensely.

 One of my favorite boards is entitled “Sleeves, Georgian and Regency Gowns,”

 

When I think of classic high-waisted regency gowns, I think of gossamer white muslin dresses with short puffed sleeves. These puffed sleeves, popularly called bishop sleeves, changed over time. By the late 1830’s in the romantic period, the fullness of the sleeve moved down the arm. (Evolution of Fashion Quizlet – Regency Fashion Vocabulary)

Dr. Syntax card party

Rowlandson’s Dr. Syntax prints, 1809-12. Image-Vic Sanborn of a print owned by Vic Sanborn. Notice the variety of bishop sleeves. The sleeve on the girl playing with the dog is set smooth in the armhole.

[The sleeve] can be set smooth into the armhole or have a bit of fullness – especially as you move into the 18-Teens. Generally, the fuller the sleeve head (top of sleeve) the later the style. – Jennifer Rosbrugh, Deciphering Sleeve Styles of the Regency

 

Dr. Syntax presenting a floral offering, 1809-1812. A full bishop sleeve.

Dr. Syntax presenting a floral offering, Rowlandson, 1809-1812. A full bishop sleeve. Image by Vic Sanborn from a print owned by Vic Sanborn

To view sleeves that range from the simple to extremely intricate, click on this link to my Pinterest board on Sleeves, Georgian and Regency Gowns, which contains over 400 images of women’s sleeves in this short era.

A young girl and a maid of all work. Notice that bishop sleeves are used by young and old, as well as the working classes. Image by Vic Sanborn from a print owned by Vic Sanborn

Dr. Syntax presenting a floral offering, Rowlandson, 1809-1812. A young girl and a maid of all work enter the doorway to a cottage. Notice that bishop sleeves are used by young and old, as well as the working classes. Image by Vic Sanborn from a print owned by Vic Sanborn

More about Regency Sleeves on this blog:

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